Review – Imp of the Sun


This game is a fascinating story that will have you hooked on the first day. You must find and evade the sun spot before he can get to your son. Hundreds of levels, countless hours of gameplay await.

Imp of the Sun is a challenging platformer game. The game has very simple mechanics and controls, but it’s also incredibly hard. This makes for an interesting mix that will keep you coming back for more. Read more in detail here: why is the sun important.

On the surface, Imp of the Sun seemed to be simply another indie platformer. Going in, it was difficult to imagine anything other than another ordinary game that would be entertaining for a few hours before being forgotten. What wasn’t anticipated was anything more comparable to Ori and the Blind Forest’s style, or anything in that (very attractive) vein. Imp of the Sun essentially throws you into the world and informs you what your final objective is; it’s up to you to figure out how to get there.

Imp of the Sun Qari

…and then we’re off.

This is the first feature in a game like this that can either be admired or despised. There are four primary bosses in Imp of the Sun, including the last monster. To face the final opponent, each of the four primary bosses must be fought, with each location offering a new ability that may aid exploration. This is where I made my first error; the first place I chose to assault may have been the worst route to go in; the region’s boss was a huge problem. However, I love the flexibility in allowing me to select any level right away. I couldn’t possibly be that enraged. The good thing is that Imp of the Sun has rapid travel, so you can hop about to other areas before returning.

Traveling about has the benefit of earning experience and allowing you to level up your magic, health, and damage as you beat foes. Unlike games like Mega Man, this enables you to build up stats to offer yourself a better chance of defeating enemies later on. With that said, Imp of the Sun isn’t very lengthy, taking just around 4 hours to complete in total; maybe less if you’re not as obstinate as me and don’t keep fighting the same monster instead of moving on to a new region.

After completing the game, you’ll be able to play it again in Eclipse+ mode, which allows you to start with all of the powers from the beginning rather than having to discover them all over again. The disadvantage is that you can no longer simply replenish magic; instead, you must light lamps throughout the levels. Then and only then will you be able to recover your stats while in this mode.

Imp of the Sun Graphics

The game’s level design has an earthy feel to it.

Imp of the Sun has a similar aesthetic to Guacamelee, with the key distinction being that this one is obviously influenced by Peruvian (and by extension, Incan) culture and iconography, rather than Mexican culture. The painting has a really smooth feel to it. It’s earthy, sometimes a little too dark, but never unappealing to the eye. I should also mention that the introductions for each of the bosses were pleasant and appropriate for their different settings. The music, on the other hand, may not have stood out as much as the visual style, but it still came together in the end. It wasn’t really noteworthy. During boss bouts, I had hoped for something more dramatic or thrilling, but overall, I was delighted with the music. I didn’t want to turn the volume down because of that, so there’s that.

Imp_Eclipse

To unlock the game’s easy but immensely enjoyable NG+ mode, you must first complete the game.

From start to finish, Imp of the Sun was a delightful little drama. I liked how it didn’t attempt to hold my hand from the start, instead asking me to sort things out on my own. I particularly appreciated the game’s post-game content, which included a good (and tough) NG+ level that made things a lot more stressful on my second playthrough. Imp of the Sun’s replayability much above that of most games of its size and breadth. If you like this genre, the material will keep you entertained, thus this is a no-brainer suggestion.

Imp of the Sun has a fantastic art style. Everything seems earthy, yet attractive to the eyes, thanks to the strongly Peruvian/Incan influenced artwork and level design.

The game Imp of the Sun is a typical action platformer. While it isn’t very good, the fact that they just dump you in and let you go makes it preferable to most games that spend an hour coddling you.

The music isn’t quite out of this world. Some areas may need a little more suitable music, but overall, it’s still fantastic. I didn’t want to turn off the music on any of the tunes in the game’s soundtrack.

The game Imp of the Sun is a well-balanced action platformer. It’s a fantastic introduction to the genre for anybody new to video games, but it’s also a superb game for veterans and fans alike.

Final Score: 7.5

The game Imp of the Sun is out now for Nintendo Switch, PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.

On the Nintendo Switch, a review was conducted.

The publisher sent me a copy of Imp of the Sun.

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